Tropical Storm Fred Leaves Allegheny River, Surrounding Creeks Dangerously High

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WARREN, Pa. – According to Allegheny Outfitters, the remnants of Tropical Storm Fred has left the Allegheny River and surround creeks dangerously high.

(Photo courtesy of Allegheny Outfitters)

In a Facebook post, the company said Fred had dropped anywhere between two to five inches of water in the last 40 hours causing Allegheny River conditions to change.

“Allegheny River water temperature at Kinzua Dam (is) 72 degrees,” the post, made at around 10 a.m. Thursday, Aug. 19, said. “The USACE outflow at Kinzua Dam is 1,390 cfs (normal summer average 1,800-2,000 cfs).”

According to Allegheny Outfitters, the updated US Army Corp of Engineers (USACE) five-day forecast shows the river outflow jumping to 3,100 cfs later Thursday and to 7,900 cfs by Friday. Because of that, they will close all river rental operations for the weekend (they close river rentals operations at 5,000 cfs).

In addition, the Allegheny River has also risen about an inch, and Allegheny Outfitters expects it to raise another inch-and-half, possibly 2 inches, over the next 24 hours depending on when Conewango Creek crests.

Thursday morning, Conewango Creek was sitting at 6.17 inches, up four inches from its normal of 2 to 2.5 inches and was climbing slowly.

Broenstraw Creek was sitting at 3.28 inches Thursday morning up from its normal average of 1.5 inches but was dropping.

Kinzu Lake was nearing its action stage Thursday morning at nearly 9 inches where it normally sits around 3 inches.

Allegheny Outfitters encourages people to stay off the river and creeks until the water levels fall.

“Please be patient,” the Allegheny Outfitters post said. “We’re tired of saying it this season, but again, there is no reason to put yourself, rescue personnel, or those living along the river in danger by choosing to go out there when the river is high. We’ll keep you posted as the water settles and we learn more from USACE.”

View the full Allegheny Outfitters Facebook post